Category Archives: Collection Spotlight

Books on Critical Race Theory

Critical Race Theory (CRT) is a movement currently in the news. Here are a few recommendations of books that discuss concepts instrumental in the development of CRT:

Crenshaw, K., Gotanda, N.m Feller, G., Thoman, K. (eds.) (1996). Critical race theory with key writings that formed the movement. New Press. KF4755.A75 C7 1995

Delgado, R. and Stefancic, J. (2017). Critical race theory: an introduction. New York University Press. KF4755.D454 2012 or online

Marx, K. (2000). The German ideology. The Electric Book Company. online or 1970 version HX276.M2782

The library sought recommendations from various faculty and administration members at Regent University for resources that provide a Christian perspective. (N.B. Works by Christians may or may not reflect a Biblical worldview.)

Baucham, V. (2021). Fault lines: the social justice movement and evangelicalism’s looming catastrophe. Salem Books. BT738.B29

Groothuis, D. R. (2000). Truth decay: defending Christianity against the challenges of postmodernism. Intervarsity Press. BT50.G66 or online

Mason, E. (2021). Urban apologetics: Restoring black dignity with the gospel. Zondervan. online

Tisby, J. (2021). How to fight racism: Courageous Christianity and the journey toward racial justice. Zondervan Reflective. BT734.2 T57

Trueman, C. R. (2021, February). Evangelicals and Race Theory. First Things. https://www.firstthings.com/article/2021/02/evangelicals-and-race-theory

Williams, T. J. (2020). Confronting injustice without compromising truth: 12 questions Christians should ask about social justice. Zondervan Academic. BR115.J8 W55

These books are available through the library. Check our new website for more information. https://www.regent.edu/regent-library/

– Dr. Esther R. Gillie, Dean of the University Library

 

Collection Spotlight: Passage to Israel, by Karen Lehrman Bloch

PassageBloch, Karen Lehrman. 2016. Passage to Israel. New York: Skyhorse Publishing. http:library.regent.edurecord=b2675954.

How is it that, year after year, the UN World Happiness Report ranks Israel as one of the world’s happiest nations? Israel – a country with compulsory military service, internal and external enemies bent on its destruction, and three national days of mourning. Readers looking for an answer to this paradox should check out Passage to Israel, a photographic tour through the astonishing varieties of nature, life, creativity, and faith that define Israel.

Divided into four sections – Land, Light, Life, and Soul – Passage to Israel presents the work of 34 of the country’s most gifted photographers with a forward and introduction that communicate the love and enthusiasm that together were the book’s genesis.

In her acknowledgments, the author writes that inspiration came not only from lovers of Israel (Jewish, Christian, and Muslim) but also from the lies and disinformation that form part of the daily output in most of the global media. She also reveals a powerful idea at the book’s heart: “Israel is indeed a mirror to one’s soul. Those who see the beauty, who stand up for the truth, who understand the meaning, will never regret where they stood in this moment of history, when silence is not an option. Am Yisrael Chai

Collection Spotlight: One Hundred Pieces of Sun: Diary of a Potted Plant, by C.L. Kennedy

100pieces“Trust in the Lord with all thine heart;
and lean not unto thine own understanding.
In all thy ways acknowledge him,
and he shall direct thy paths.”

-Proverbs 3:5 (KJV)

One Hundred Pieces of Sun: Diary of a Potted Plant is really three books in one: (1) a social history of the American Deep South and northern Rust Belt in the 1950s and 1960s, (2) an autobiography of C.L. Kennedy’s childhood and youth, and (3) a travelogue through Africa during the 1970-71 academic year. Remarkably, the author weaves these disparate subjects into a unified whole.

Simply put, this is the freshest, most unique memoir I have ever read, charting a trajectory from the author’s childhood in Jim Crow Alabama and a not-exactly-equal-rights northern industrial city, to Sarah Lawrence College, and ending with her junior year abroad at the University of Ghana, followed by travels through most of the continent using only local transportation. (Yes, her mother threw a fit when Kennedy first told her about her plans.)

The marvelous writing is infused Kennedy’s personality – strong, highly opinionated, but always honest and with an eye for the humor in life. Here, for the benefit of prospective readers, are three excerpts to give an idea of the book’s historical and emotional range:

  1. Traveling by train from Alabama to Ohio in 1956:
    “Before the trip North, Brenda [the author’s sister] and I were repeatedly coached, drilled, and cautioned not to say anything to any white person, no matter what they said, did, or called us…We were rehearsed in acceptable docile and self-effacing ways to respond if it became absolutely necessary to engage in eye-contact or communication with a stranger” (p. 19-20).

  2. Using the public library in Ohio:
    “Laws prohibited Blacks from checking out public library books and from entering the front door of the public library. Our parents took us to the library just as they took us to church…They showed us the way to carry and conduct ourselves with integrity, dignity, and pride, and they always reminded us that we were responsible for leaving a legacy, adding something to posterity, and never shaming the race” (p. 81).

  3. Discovering a possible origin of her ancestors (or at least her own spiritual homeland) through music:
    “In Mali, I was introduced to the cora, a bowl-shaped musical instrument that is made either from dried gourds with leather chords extending along an attached long handle or a flat wooden box enhanced with wood or metal picks held in place along the bottom and spaced along the top…Music from Mali featuring the cora soothes my very soul. Much to my surprise, many times I have felt that Mali was my home place, the country of my ancestors” (p. 211).*

    1. The author’s understanding of the violence and injustice blacks (in both Old and New Worlds) have suffered at the hands of whites is never far removed in the text, but Kennedy’s gratitude and enthusiasm for life ensure that her lessons are always delivered with a light touch. Another constant in the book, especially at critical moments, but never sermonized about, is her deep Christian faith instilled by her parents.

      Although not a work of fiction, it does not seem inappropriate to call One Hundred Pieces of Sun a Bildungsroman, as it completely convincingly tells the story of the coming-of-age of a highly sensitive and intelligent young woman. Kennedy has written a book that engages with and invites the reader to see the world through her eyes. And that, I think, is one of the best things any book can do for us.

      *For a sample of this remarkable music, click here.

Spotlight on Faculty Scholarship

A selection of the recent faculty monographs. See our Facebook and Google+ pages for more photos from this event. A selection of the recent faculty monographs. See our Facebook and Google+ pages for more photos from this event.

On November 15, the Library inaugurated what it hopes will become a long-standing tradition on campus: a special event to honor faculty authors and formally induct their scholarship into the Library collection.

As this was our first time holding such an event, we included works published from January 2014 through May 2016. The numbers are impressive: 33 books or book chapters by 36 authors, as well as scholarly articles by 49 authors. A total of 82 members of the faculty were honored.

In addition to recognizing all the recent faculty authors, our event featured book talks by two of them: Dr. Joseph Bucci from the College of Arts & Sciences gave an overview of his book Redemptive Leadership: Offering Second Chances as a Value-Added Management Practice, and Dr. Diane Chandler, from the School of Divinity presented some of the main themes in her monograph, Christian Spiritual Formation: An Integrated Approach for Personal and Relational Wholeness.

At the end of the book talks, all monograph authors were invited to inscribe the Library’s copies of their works, and article authors received a special bookmark with the title and publication of their work. In April 2017, we will hold our second Spotlight on Faculty Scholarship to honor faculty publication beginning with June 2016.

Photos from this event may be viewed on our Facebook and Google+ pages.

The Encyclopedia of Christian Education

by Sandra Yaegle, Head of Public Services

The Library has just acquired an important new encyclopedia from Rowman & Littlefield. The Encyclopedia of Christian Education contains over 1,200 entries by 400 contributors from 75 countries. The three-volume work covers a vast range of topics, including: