Library Launches the Way-In Discussion Series

Regent University Library, the intellectual hub of the campus, invites the Regent community to engage in conversation, discussion, and exploration of life’s challenging issues. Each month, the topic explored will concern wicked issues, that is, complex situations where no one answer is sufficient. Often the Christian perspective is absent from these kinds of conversations. The Way-In series encourages the inclusion of Christian perspectives, Scriptural insights, and Divine wisdom.

Jesus said “I am the way, the truth, and the life” (John 14:6). If Jesus is the Way, what might a Christian response to various challenging issues look like? We invite you to peruse some Regent University faculty perspectives, explore some resources on the topic, and most importantly, “weigh in” and provide your reflections and responses in the comments section. We will respond with a YouTube recording to answer questions and respond to your comments in a few weeks.

Proverbs 16:16 reminds us that getting wisdom is better than gold, and insight better than silver. Together, let us explore the wisdom available to us as we consider these topics.

– Dr. Esther R. Gillie, Dean of the University Library

Remembering Reinhard Bonnke

Image credit: https://www.facebook.com/evangelistreinhardbonnke/

Evangelist Reinhard Bonnke, who dedicated his life to bringing the Gospel to people all over the world, passed away at the age of 79 on December 7, 2019.

Although his ministry would eventually reach to every continent, it is Africa where Bonnke had perhaps the most profound impact, bringing millions of people to Christ from his first visit in 1967 to his final Crusade in 2017. For his love and devotion for the people of Africa, Bonnke became affectionately known as “the Billy Graham of Africa.” Dr. Corné Bekker, Dean of the School of Divinity and a native of South Africa, attended several of Bonnke’s prayer meetings and recalls that “There would be a wonderful time of worship, he would preach the Gospel, very simple Gospel of Jesus Christ, and then he would give an invitation for people to come forward, and people in their thousands, sometimes, hundreds of thousands of people, would come forward and dedicate their lives unto the Lord.”1

Throughout the years, Bonnke was a regular guest on the 700 Club and in March 2013 preached at the dedication services of the newly completed University Chapel. The Library has a selection of his books and video spanning 1992-2013. During February, a display in the Library will commemorate the life and work of this tireless servant of the Lord.

1George Thomas, “Remembering ‘God’s General’ Reinhard Bonnke,” CBN News, December 9, 2019, https://www1.cbn.com/cbnnews/cwn/2019/december/remembering-gods-general-reinhard-bonnke.

Safari Books now O’Reilly for Higher Education

Safari Books Online has been re-branded as O’Reilly for Higher Education.

O’Reilly Media, the owner of Safari, has created a new platform to provide users with enhanced content and a more functional interface This premium management and technology resource offers more than 35K ebook titles, 30K hours of video, learning paths, case studies, interactive tutorials, and audio books from 250 of the world’s leading publishers.

To use the new platform, users must set up a personal account with their Regent email address. To get started, simply go to O’Reilly for Higher Education on the Library database page. After clicking on the database link, use the drop down menu to select “Not listed? Click here.” This will take you to the login page where you will enter your Regent email address and click “Let’s Go.” You will then be logged in and have access to the O’Reilly platform.

A welcome email will be sent to you with a confirmation link to choose a password. Setting a password is optional and you can continue accessing the site following the instructions above without a password.

Comments about O’Reilly? Please email us your opinion at librarians@regent.edu.

Game Night at the Library on Monday, November 11

For thousands of years, games such as Chess and Go gave been used to improve strategic and tactical skills in players. While nearly everyone is familiar with Monopoly (first copyrighted in 1934), it has almost no strategic element and poorly mimics real business because it is “in fact, is a classic example of what economists call a zero-sum game.”1

Enter a new generation of board games designed to reflect how humans actually interact with one another in challenging situations. Writing in Harvard Business Review, Andrew Innes explains that “a board game is a tiny universe: The rules are the laws of physics or social norms, the board is the physical environment, cards often function as resources or catalysts, dice provide a dollop of randomness. And those little pawns? They’re you and me.”2 Not only do the new board games more closely mirror the real worlds of human interaction, they can educate by “forcing us into the spotlight, making us communicate in unusual and uncomfortable ways, or encouraging us to take giant lateral leaps in thinking.”2

Join the Library in the Gallery area on Monday, November 11 from 7:00pm to 9:00pm, as we explore and play two of the most popular of the new generation of strategic-cooperative games. Catan and Pandemic. No experience is needed, and we will begin by with an overview of each game. For players who prefer the classic games of strategy, high-quality Go and chess sets will be on hand.

For more information about this event, please contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

1WIRED Staff, “Monopoly Killer: Perfect German Board Game Redefines Genre,” Wired (Conde Nast, June 4, 2017), https://www.wired.com/2009/03/mf-settlers/?currentPage=2.

2IAndrew Innes, “What Board Games Can Teach Business,” Harvard Business Review, March 19, 2015, https://hbr.org/2015/01/what-board-games-can-teach-business.

 

Lecture: The English Bible from King James to Robert Alter

Decorative book covers on the volumes of Robert Alter’s Hebrew Bible

Last December, W. W. Norton published the complete translation of The Hebrew Bible by Robert Alter. The work, which took Alter twenty-five years to complete, has been hailed as one of the most significant achievements in the history of English Bible translation by both admirers and critics of Alter’s text.

On November 5, Rabbi Dr. Michael Panitz will present a lecture and lead a discussion on this milestone work of scholarship, theology, and literature: From King James to Robert Alter: English Bible Translations, Then and Now. In his lecture, Rabbi Panitz will focus on four excerpts from Alter’s text:

  • Genesis 1:1 – 2:4
  • II Samuel 11:26 – 12:14
  • Psalm 27
  • Job 38 – 39

Volumes containing these Scriptures are available in the Library, and readers can receive a free copy of the excerpts by emailing a request to Harold Henkel (harohen@regent.edu). An excellent and accessible lecture with Alter explaining his goals as a Biblical translator is on YouTube.

The event will take place in the Library Gallery at 2:00 p.m. and will be live-streamed on Collaborate Ultra.

Rabbi Panitz was ordained at the Jewish Theological Seminary in 1982 and received his Ph.D. in Jewish history there in 1989. He served on the Seminary’s faculty until 1992 and has been the Rabbi of Temple Israel, Norfolk, since then. Dr. Panitz is also an adjunct professor of Religious Studies at Virginia Wesleyan University and an Adjunct Professor of Hebrew Language at Old Dominion University.