Tag Archives: Bible

Bible treasures on display at the Library

The Word of God is foundational to everything we do at Regent University, especially in academic pursuits. The Library is proud of our amazing collection of 1,884 Bibles in 52 languages and 46 versions, translations, and paraphrases. Our goal is to make the Word of God easily accessible and to create visual reminders of God’s Word and its importance to our work.

The Library is currently displaying a selection of its Bibles in the foyer and throughout the first floor. One example is a reproduction of the Gutenberg Bible. Experts painstakingly reproduced the binding, letters, drawings, colors and even the type of paper stock to make this a near-perfect copy of the original.

We invite our patrons who have been cleared to enter the Library to take a few moments on their next visit to enjoy the displays of these precious Bibles.

– Dr. Esther R. Gillie, Dean of the University Library

Gutenberg Bible facsimile. On display in the Library.

Book Discussion: The Secret Chord, by Geraldine Brooks

SecretChordGeraldine Brooks is one of the great living writers of historical fiction. Having published acclaimed novels set during the 1666 plague in England, the American Civil War, and Puritan Massachusetts, Brooks’ latest work takes on the daunting challenge of bringing the United Monarchy of King David to life.

Expanding on the spare Biblical narrative, The Secret Chord traces the arc of David’s journey from shepherd to soldier, from hero to betrayer, from beloved king to murderous despot, and into his remorseful old age. We see David through the eyes of those who love him or fear him—from the prophet Natan, voice of his conscience, to his wives Mikhal, Avigail, and Batsheva, and finally to Solomon, the late-born son who redeems his old age.

The Library owns four copies of The Secret Chord. The book is also widely available from public libraries in print and audio form. Our discussion of will take place on Tuesday, September 27 at 12:00pm in the Library Conference Room. A Biblical snack will be served.

Distance students and faculty are invited to join the discussion via Google Hangouts. For a complete schedule of 2016-2017 book discussions, see the Library Book Club webpage.

Libraries in the News: World’s oldest Bible goes online

Codex Sinaiticus: Song of Songs 1:1-4.The Codex Sinaiticus is the oldest known surviving manuscript of the Bible. Copied by four scribes sometime between 325 and 360, the entire Bible is in Greek, the text of the Old Testament being the Septuagint. The manuscript takes its name from the Monastery of St. Catherine in the Sinai desert, where it was discovered in 1844 by a German archaeologist Constantin von Tischendorf who brought a portion of the manuscript to Leipzig University. He returned in 1853 for more. On his final trip to the monastery in 1859, Tischendorf took 694 pages of the Bible, which he brought to St. Petersburg, Russia. The precise terms under which Tischendorf executed these transfers are disputed. In 1933, the Soviet government, desperate for cash, sold the codex to Britain for £100,000. In 1975, an additional 12 pages and 40 fragments were found at St. Catherine’s.

The Codex Sinaiticus is now split between four owners: