Category Archives: News Features

Learn a foreign language this summer!

Do you know what foreign languages your friends at Regent are learning? Between May 2020 and April 2021, 1,203 members of the Regent community studied 38 modern, 4 ancient, and 2 English as a Second Language courses using the Mango Languages software. The course that saw the greatest increase in use was Haitian Creole, with 108 learning sessions, making it the 4th most studied language. 73% of all learning sessions were on mobile devices, with an average session length of 15 minutes.

Here, by order of learning sessions, are the twenty most popular Mango languages at Regent during the past year:

Rank Language Learning Sessions
1 French 1,107
2 Spanish, Latin American 637
3 German 113
4 Haitian Creole 108
5 Chinese, Mandarin 87
6 Portuguese, Brazil 85
7 Japanese 59
8 Dutch 58
9 Russian 42
10 Hebrew, Biblical 34
11 Greek, Modern 24
12  Tagalog 23
13 Hebrew, Modern 29
14 Greek, Ancient 24
15 Italian 22
16 Turkish 21
17 Greek, New Testament 20
18  Latin 8
19 Tamil 7
20 Arabic, Egyptian 6

Mango offers an amazing array of language and cultural products available 24/7 to current Regent users and alumni, including 72 foreign languages, 17 ESL courses, and special cultural training courses, such as Arab etiquette and Chinese business customs. For advanced learners, Mango even has full-length foreign films with subtitles and special learning tools.

Whether you are planning a mission trip to Japan, getting in touch with your Irish roots, or have always wanted to read the Bible in the original Hebrew and Greek, Mango Languages can help you achieve your goals. Language study is a crucial component for understanding another culture. While complete fluency in a language requires years of study, even basic proficiency will make you feel more at ease when abroad and impress your overseas contacts with your good manners in taking the time to learn some of their language. It will also make your time in a foreign country much more rewarding. As the great filmmaker Federico Fellini put it, “A different language is a different vision of life.”

New banners display Library’s core values

Nearly everyone agrees that, both for individuals and organizations, living by certain values is important, but how does this manifest itself in practice? According to Harvard Business School professors Clayton Christiansen and Michael Overdorf, organizational values are “the standards by which employees set priorities” about what is more and less important in their operations.* Along with its Vision and Mission statements, the Library lists four core values, exemplified by Scripture.

With the help of Regent marketing, the Library has created attractive banners for each of our core values. They are in front of the resource desk. Photos of each banner are located on our Facebook and  Instagram pages.

*Clayton M. Christiansen and Michael Overdorf, “Meeting the Challenge of Disruptive Change. (Cover Story),” Harvard Business Review 78, no. 2 (March 2000): 69, http://eres.regent.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?authtype=ip,uid&profile=bsi&defaultdb=bth&defaultdb=buh

Bible treasures on display at the Library

The Word of God is foundational to everything we do at Regent University, especially in academic pursuits. The Library is proud of our amazing collection of 1,884 Bibles in 52 languages and 46 versions, translations, and paraphrases. Our goal is to make the Word of God easily accessible and to create visual reminders of God’s Word and its importance to our work.

The Library is currently displaying a selection of its Bibles in the foyer and throughout the first floor. One example is a reproduction of the Gutenberg Bible. Experts painstakingly reproduced the binding, letters, drawings, colors and even the type of paper stock to make this a near-perfect copy of the original.

We invite our patrons who have been cleared to enter the Library to take a few moments on their next visit to enjoy the displays of these precious Bibles.

– Dr. Esther R. Gillie, Dean of the University Library

Gutenberg Bible facsimile. On display in the Library.

Keep your research organized with RefWorks

If you are still emailing articles to yourself from Summon and databases, it’s time to sign up for RefWorks. RefWorks allows you to export citation information and direct links to articles, books, streaming video, and even websites into your personal online account. Inside your account, you can organize your research into folders by class or project.

While writing your papers, RefWorks operates with Word to create bibliographic references and in-text citations in all major styles, including the latest editions of APA, MLA, and Turabian.
With RefWorks, there is no need to maintain personal accounts with multiple database vendors. All your research is safely located in a central account that you will be able to keep after you graduate at no charge.

To get started with this indispensable resource, click here, enter your Regent e-mail address so that RefWorks will recognize you as a Regent user, and follow the prompts.

Once you have opened an account, the easiest way to get started is to watch the YouTube tutorials and try a few searches and exports in Summon. If you need any help getting started, contact us through the Ask a Librarian page.

Essential links on the Library website

 

Did you miss the Campus Virtual Connection Fair? Here are some of the essential links on the Library website that we shared and want everyone at Regent to know about:

The Basics

Access Services

Research Help

  •  Summon – Think of it as Google for the Library. Best way to start your research.
  • Ask a librarian – So many ways to contact your librarians and ask for help.
  • Research guides – Find out the core databases and authoritative websites for your classes.
  • Digital reference section – No Wikipedia here! Only scholarly and citable dictionaries and encyclopedias.
  • Online Video – Thousands of streaming videos in all subjects.
  • eBook collections – Find out how to search for ebooks.

Social Media

Image credit: Neel, A. (2017, March 05). Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash. Retrieved September 16, 2020, from https://unsplash.com/photos/QLqNalPe0RA